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With respect to what many are calling the “War on Wealth”, how do you think the age of digital currency poses an increasing threat to privacy and wealth?

Bob Wiedemer


Aftershock Investor
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Video Transcript

Announcer: With respect to what many are calling the "War on Wealth," how do you think the age of digital currency poses an increasing threat to privacy and wealth?

Robert Wiedemer: Well, I don't think there's any question to one of the huge trends we've seen in our society, over the last several decades, is the electronification of our communications of our financial transactions. That of course was a natural outcome of change to technology and all good. What it also means is that it's much easier to monitor all of what we say, all of what we...transact and finance. It's easy for the government to do it, it could be easy for other people to do it, and that's a real issue for privacy for America. We've certainly seen a lot of controversy over how much the government can look into what we're doing, what we're spending money on, and how much it should be allowed to, but unquestionably, I think no matter where this goes, there's certainly the ability to monitor everything that goes on in our electronic lives, which is increasingly so much of our lives. It's going to continue and you could call it a "War on Privacy," but basically what we're going to see is technology and government interest going together where... it's just much easier...whenever it's much easier...it's sort of like the key is in the ignition, somebody will steal the car. When it's easier to monitor, there's going to be a tendency to do a whole lot more monitoring is my guess. It's just the nature of technology and the nature of government, I think at this point.

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