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Will expectations of global monetary easing ignite higher commodity prices?

*Reuters, by Susan Thomas, November 30, 2011

‘Gold rose to the highest in almost two weeks on Wednesday after top central banks announced a co-ordinated move to avoid a global liquidity crunch, and the dollar fell.

Centrals banks from the world’s leading economies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank, said they had agreed to lower the cost of existing dollar swap lines by 50 basis points, as well other measures.

Spot gold rose more than 2 percent to $1,749.54, its highest since Nov. 17.  It was $1,744.79 per ounce at 1525 GMT, from $1,714.29 late in New York on Tuesday.

U.S. gold rose 1.8 percent to $1,744.50.

Gold had reversed losses earlier after China moved to ease credit strains, by cutting the reserve requirement ratio for its commercial lenders for the first time in nearly three years.

‘Today’s central bank decisions – both from the Fed, ECB and other western banks, and separately from the People’s Bank of China – are unambiguously good for gold in that they’re inflationary,’ said Matthew Turner, precious metals strategist at Mitsubishi. ‘Gold tends to go up when the inflationary outlook worsens.’

‘The outlook remains dependent on such actions, who knows what the central banks will do next – probably not even the central banks themselves,’ he added.

Traditionally, gold can benefit in times of economic or financial market uncertainty, because of the protection it can offer if inflation picks up and because of its immediate convertibility into hard currency.”

”Palladium rose more than 5 percent to a high of $622.50, and was $608.22 at 1526 GMT.  Silver was up 1.9 percent at $32.51, platinum rose 1.1 percent to $1,547.49”


*This information is solely a highlight of the opinion of a third-party publication and is incomplete.  Please subscribe to this publication for the full and timely opinion of the author and call a Monex Account Representative for any additional up-to-date information. This is not an offer to buy or sell precious metals. Investors should obtain advice based on their own individual circumstances and understand the risk before making any investment decision.

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